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Experiences of accessing obesity surgery on the NHS: a qualitative study

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Experiences of accessing obesity surgery on the NHS : a qualitative study. / Owen-Smith, Amanda; Donovan, Jenny; Coast, Joanna.

In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 163-169.

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Owen-Smith, Amanda; Donovan, Jenny; Coast, Joanna / Experiences of accessing obesity surgery on the NHS : a qualitative study.

In: Journal of Public Health, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 163-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{b23ac2a8829c4171bc4df9d24b589862,
title = "Experiences of accessing obesity surgery on the NHS: a qualitative study",
abstract = "Background Although surgical treatment is recommended for morbid obesity where other interventions have failed, there is evidence that access to NHS surgery is heavily rationed. This study aimed to investigate how patients experienced accessing referrals for obesity surgery. Methods Data collection was undertaken using in-depth interviews with patients and clinicians working in a specialist secondary care facility, and analysis took a constant comparative approach. Results Twenty-two participants with morbid obesity were followed up for a period of up to 3 years. All participants had made multiple attempts to lose weight prior to consulting their GPs yet felt this was rarely acknowledged by clinicians. Participants were frustrated when they received insufficient support to comply with primary care interventions, and when it came to obtaining a referral to secondary care, most had to raise this issue with GPs themselves. Conclusions There is an urgent need for interventions for morbid obesity in primary care that are accessible to patients to facilitate weight loss and prevent weight re-gain. For those at very high weights, better integration between primary and secondary care is required to ensure appropriate and timely referral for those who need assessment for surgery.",
keywords = "GPs morbid obesity obesity primary care qualitative",
author = "Amanda Owen-Smith and Jenny Donovan and Joanna Coast",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1093/pubmed/fdv209",
volume = "39",
pages = "163--169",
journal = "Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0125-1678",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experiences of accessing obesity surgery on the NHS

T2 - Journal of Public Health

AU - Owen-Smith,Amanda

AU - Donovan,Jenny

AU - Coast,Joanna

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Background Although surgical treatment is recommended for morbid obesity where other interventions have failed, there is evidence that access to NHS surgery is heavily rationed. This study aimed to investigate how patients experienced accessing referrals for obesity surgery. Methods Data collection was undertaken using in-depth interviews with patients and clinicians working in a specialist secondary care facility, and analysis took a constant comparative approach. Results Twenty-two participants with morbid obesity were followed up for a period of up to 3 years. All participants had made multiple attempts to lose weight prior to consulting their GPs yet felt this was rarely acknowledged by clinicians. Participants were frustrated when they received insufficient support to comply with primary care interventions, and when it came to obtaining a referral to secondary care, most had to raise this issue with GPs themselves. Conclusions There is an urgent need for interventions for morbid obesity in primary care that are accessible to patients to facilitate weight loss and prevent weight re-gain. For those at very high weights, better integration between primary and secondary care is required to ensure appropriate and timely referral for those who need assessment for surgery.

AB - Background Although surgical treatment is recommended for morbid obesity where other interventions have failed, there is evidence that access to NHS surgery is heavily rationed. This study aimed to investigate how patients experienced accessing referrals for obesity surgery. Methods Data collection was undertaken using in-depth interviews with patients and clinicians working in a specialist secondary care facility, and analysis took a constant comparative approach. Results Twenty-two participants with morbid obesity were followed up for a period of up to 3 years. All participants had made multiple attempts to lose weight prior to consulting their GPs yet felt this was rarely acknowledged by clinicians. Participants were frustrated when they received insufficient support to comply with primary care interventions, and when it came to obtaining a referral to secondary care, most had to raise this issue with GPs themselves. Conclusions There is an urgent need for interventions for morbid obesity in primary care that are accessible to patients to facilitate weight loss and prevent weight re-gain. For those at very high weights, better integration between primary and secondary care is required to ensure appropriate and timely referral for those who need assessment for surgery.

KW - GPs morbid obesity obesity primary care qualitative

U2 - 10.1093/pubmed/fdv209

DO - 10.1093/pubmed/fdv209

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 163

EP - 169

JO - Journal of Public Health

JF - Journal of Public Health

SN - 0125-1678

IS - 1

ER -