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Dr A D WilsonB.V.M.&S.(Edin.), M.V.Sc.(Saskatoon), Ph.D.(Bristol), M.R.C.V.S.

Senior Lecturer

Doug Wilson

Dr A D WilsonB.V.M.&S.(Edin.), M.V.Sc.(Saskatoon), Ph.D.(Bristol), M.R.C.V.S.

Senior Lecturer

Member of

Research interests

My main research interests are immunological disorders in horses, such as sarcoids, insect bite hypersensitivity to salivary antigens of Culicoides species and the severe inflammatory reaction which occurs after Anoplocephala perfoliata infection.

In equine species sarcoids is a collective term for a group of non-resolving pathological skin lesions, characterised by proliferation of fibroblasts along with the presence of DNA from Bovine Papilloma Virus (BPV)1 or BPV2: together these lesions comprise the commonest skin tumours in equines. My research findings suggest that the regulatory cytokine micro-environment within sarcoids enables the persistence of the lesions by preventing an effective anti-viral immune response.

Infection of horses with Anoplocephala perfoliata induces a severe inflammatory reaction of the caecal mucosa around the site of parasite attachment adjacent to the ileocecal valve. Lesions show epithelial erosion or ulceration of the mucosa with infiltration by eosinophils, lymphocytes and mast cells leading to oedema, gross thickening and fibrosis of the caecal wall. We have shown that there is an active immune response to A. perfoliata within the caecal mucosa involving local production of both IgG(T) (in horses, the term IgG(T) refers to IgG3 and IgG5) and IgE antibody isotypes; but it remains unclear whether this immune response can reduce or eliminate parasite burden.

Culicoides spp. are vectors of several infectious diseases of veterinary importance and a major cause of allergy in horses and other livestock. Their saliva contains a number of proteins which enable blood feeding, enhance disease transmission and act as allergens. We have constructed of a novel cDNA library from Culicoides nubeculosus linked to the analysis of abundant salivary gland proteins by mass spectrometry. Using a library based on these proteins, we are currently investigating the possibility of using oral immunotherapy as a treatment to desensitise horses with insect bite hypersensitivity in a study funded by the Horse Trust.

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Postal address:
Langford House
Langford
Bristol
United Kingdom
Postal address:
Langford House
Langford
Bristol
BS40 5DU
United Kingdom

Selected research outputs

  1. Published

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