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Dr Domingo J TortoneseD.V.M., Dr.Vet.Sci.(LaPlata), Ph.D.(W.Virginia)

Senior Lecturer in Anatomy

Domingo Tortonese

Dr Domingo J TortoneseD.V.M., Dr.Vet.Sci.(LaPlata), Ph.D.(W.Virginia)

Senior Lecturer in Anatomy

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Research interests

My research focuses on the neuroendocrine regulation of fertility.

The specific aim is to identify the signal transduction pathways and the neural, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the control of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin secretion during naturally occurring temporal changes in fertility.

To this end, my team has developed two complementary lines of research: on one hand, to investigate the regulation of GnRH neuronal networks within the hypothalamus, and, on the other, the paracrine interactions within the pituitary gland that may modulate the response of gonadotroph cells to GnRH stimulation. The link between these two lines of research is the participation of prolactin, a hormone that, in addition to its role during lactation, has been shown to negatively regulate the reproductive axis.

We have employed in vivo and in vitro strategies in an integrated manner using immortalised cell lines and four experimental models. Overall, this inter-disciplinary, multi-model, integrated strategy has allowed us to investigate the topic from its molecular basis to whole systems.

In addition to our main research, I have developed two separate equine projects with institutions within and outside the UK, to assess: i) the neuroendocrine mechanisms that mediate the effects of transmeridian flying on equine physiology and performance; and ii) meiotic segregation in equine hybrids.

 

Research findings

  • Signal transduction pathways and neuronal mechanisms underlying the effects of prolactin on the control of fertility.
  • Intra-pituitary regulation of gonadotrophin secretion.
  • Jetlag in horses: neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the effects of transmeridian flying on equine welfare and performance.
  • Fertility in equine hybrids.

 Further information about Dr Domingo Tortonese can be found here.

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Postal address:
Centre for Applied Anatomy
Southwell Street
Bristol
United Kingdom