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Dr Guillaume P A ChanoitDEDV (ENV Toulouse), MSc(Lyons I), PhD(Lyons I)

Senior Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery

Guillaume Chanoit

Dr Guillaume P A ChanoitDEDV (ENV Toulouse), MSc(Lyons I), PhD(Lyons I)

Senior Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery

Member of

Research interests

My research focuses on large animal models of cardiovascular and thoracic diseases. 

I studied the fundamentals of cardiovascular research during  my PhD where I examined  the effect of zinc administration on cardiac protection  in cell culture.

 

Fluorescent cardiac cells demonstrating the presence of intracellular zinc

 

Photo 1:  Confocal microscopy- Fluorescent cardiac cells demonstrating the presence of intracellular zinc ( dye : Newport green DCF)- Administration of zinc is protecting cardiac cells from reperfusion injury  (Cardiovascular Research Laboratory , UNC Chapel Hill, NC , USA).

 

 

 

 

 

Currently, I collaborate with cardiothoracic surgeons from the Bristol Heart Institute on research primarily directed towards applications in human medicine, such as surgical treatment of coronary artery diseases, cardiac preservation after myocardial infarction or congenital cardiac surgery.  However, the exciting aspect of this collaboration is the observed similarity between human and animal pathologies.

 

12 weeks old puppy suffering from a congenital heart malformation

 

Photo 2 : 12 weeks old puppy suffering from a congenital heart malformation. This picture was taken immediately before a successful operation was undertaken. The corrected pathology (patent ductus arteriosus) is also encountered in infants . 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I therefore try to promote research on naturally occurring disease animal models. I can see this as a win-win situation and a way to reduce the use of created animal models.  In my field of research, this translation to veterinary clinical applications is possible in the treatment and understanding of diseases such as dilated cardiomyopathy, mitral valve insufficiency and a wide range of congenital cardiac abnormalities, which are all conditions shared by humans and companion animal species. Another translational area relates to improving the use and understanding of cardiopulmonary bypass in animals and infants as well as strategies to enhance outcome of cardiac and thoracic surgery and minimally invasive procedures.

 

Cardiopulmonary by-pass machine

 

Photo 3 : cardiopulmonary by –pass machine . This machine is used during open heart surgery – It is the same machine that can be used in humans and animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A final area of translational research is the diagnostics and therapeutics of cardiac arrhythmias (bradyarrthymias, atrial fibrillation), a pathology shared between humans and animals that can lead to sudden death or stroke .

 

Drawing representing the surgical placement of cardiac pacemakers

Photo 4 :  Drawing representing the  surgical placement of cardiac pacemakers.  Note that the same leads and pacemakers are used in humans and animals.  (Drawing Credits : Alice Harvey, NCSU, USA) ( from Visser et al, Vet Surg 2013).

These fruitful collaborations with colleagues from human  medicine has led  to the initiation of a comparative heart and lung research program, to the benefit of both human and animal patients

 

Further information about Dr Guillaume Chanoit can be found here.

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Postal address:
Langford House
Langford
Bristol
BS40 5DU
United Kingdom