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Mr Tom E O'Shea

Doctor of Philosophy Student, Member Student

Tom O'Shea

Mr Tom E O'Shea

Doctor of Philosophy Student, Member Student

Member of

Postgraduate research supervised by

Research interests

My Ph.D. project will look to diversify and develop the detail of potential approaches towards understanding the interactions between social, geographical and physical elements within the dynamic urban landscapes of our world. The overall aim being the creation of a robust analytical and evaluative framework for the complex systematic factors that could combine with physical phenomona and result in catastrophe or it's avoidance.

Having conducted a project on flood dynamics for my MSc. thesis at UCL using a geo-statistical methodology for 12 cities around the UK, I have a working knowledge of the approaches taken to conduct a study on the nature of flooding within urban environments. This previous project focused on the broader geophysical aspects that exacerbate risk and vulnerability, with the resulting methodology, designed during the thesis, having since been incorporated into a number of subsiquent regional analyses of geophysical risk for South America and South East Asia.

My doctoral training at Bristol, funded by the European Space Agency and the EWS exceptional contribution award, will look to develop the theoretical and analytical core of this method for analysing urban flood scenarios further by using a complex method of coupled computation, between an agent-based platform and the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model, to evaluate the finer responses and interactions of urban populations affected by flood hazards, with a view to developing a broader understanding of systematic vulnerability and robustness. Specifically, the primary objective of my Ph.D. project will be to use this coupled analytical tool to assess the extent to which emergent interactions, during a hazardous event, progress the affected human population's systematic vulnerability and robustness to such events; based upon modelling the intrinsic links between 'real' economic, social and physical inputs and the human decision-making process.

Please feel free to contact Tom on his UOB email address if you have any questions regarding his research.

Supervisors: Professor Paul Bates & Doctor Jeffrey Neal (University of Bristol School of Geographical Sciences.)

 

Structured keywords and research groupings

  • Cabot Institute City Futures Research
  • Cabot Institute Water Research
  • Cabot Institute Natural Hazards and Disasters Research

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Postal address:
United Kingdom

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