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Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2139-2150
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume126
Issue number6
Early online date3 May 2016
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 10 Mar 2016
DateE-pub ahead of print - 3 May 2016
DatePublished (current) - 1 Jun 2016

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia.

METHODS: We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography.

RESULTS: Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7-9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, -8.3 to -0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups.

CONCLUSION: Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352).

FUNDING: M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was supported by R&D funding from National Health Service (NHS) Blood and Transplant and a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Programme grant (RP-PG-0310-1004). This research was funded by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre Programme.

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