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Disabled men with muscular dystrophy negotiate gender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalDisability and Society
Early online date18 Mar 2019
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 13 Feb 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print (current) - 18 Mar 2019

Abstract

Disability is often portrayed as a one-dimensional category devoid of further intersections. Work which has addressed the intersection of disability and male gender has rarely considered different types of disability or impairment or foregrounded the experiences of disabled men themselves. This paper is based on empirical work carried out in England with men who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We explored with participants their sense of themselves as men and their commonalities and differences with other men. Findings suggest that men with DMD claim, reject and redefine what it meant to them to be men. Doing gender was often heavily reliant on the availability and permission of others. Our study highlights the usefulness of exploring gender with men with particular experiences of disability and of looking at how this might change over a life course, especially when the nature and extent of the life course is a precarious one.

    Research areas

  • gender, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, intersectionality, life-course

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Taylor & Francis at https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2019.1584093 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    Licence: CC BY-NC-ND

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