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DNA nanomapping using CRISPR-Cas9 as a programmable nanoparticle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1665-1674
Number of pages9
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 24 Oct 2017
DatePublished (current) - 21 Nov 2017

Abstract

Progress in whole-genome sequencing using short-read (e.g., <150 bp), next-generation sequencing technologies has reinvigorated interest in high-resolution physical mapping to fill technical gaps that are not well addressed by sequencing. Here, we report two technical advances in DNA nanotechnology and single-molecule genomics: (1) we describe a labeling technique (CRISPR-Cas9 nanoparticles) for high-speed AFM-based physical mapping of DNA and (2) the first successful demonstration of using DVD optics to image DNA molecules with high-speed AFM. As a proof of principle, we used this new “nanomapping” method to detect and map precisely BCL2–IGH translocations present in lymph node biopsies of follicular lymphoma patents. This HS-AFM “nanomapping” technique can be complementary to both sequencing and other physical mapping approaches.

    Research areas

  • DNA, CRISPR–Cas, CRISPR, AFM, high-speed AFM, High-speed atomic force microscopy

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via [NATURE COMMUNICATIONS at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01891-9#Ack1. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    Licence: CC BY

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