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Effects of dopamine on reinforcement learning and consolidation in Parkinson’s disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere26801
Number of pages23
JournaleLife
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Jul 2017

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that dopamine may modulate learning and memory with important implications for understanding the neurobiology of memory and future therapeutic targeting. An influential hypothesis posits that dopamine biases reinforcement learning. More recent data also suggest an influence during both consolidation and retrieval. Eighteen Parkinson’s disease patients learned through feedback ON or OFF medication with memory tested 24 hours later ON or OFF medication (4 conditions, within-subjects design with matched healthy control group). Patients OFF medication during learning decreased in memory accuracy over the following 24 hours. In contrast to previous studies, however, dopaminergic medication during learning and testing did not affect expression of positive or negative reinforcement. Two further experiments were run without the 24-hour delay, but they too failed to reproduce effects of dopaminergic medication on reinforcement learning. While supportive of a dopaminergic role in consolidation, this study failed to replicate previous findings on reinforcement learning.

    Research areas

  • dopamine, reinforcement learning, parkinson's disease, memory

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via eLife Sciences at https://elifesciences.org/articles/26801#abstract. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    License: CC BY

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