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Exploring early life events including diet in cats presenting for gastrointestinal signs in later life

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Record
Early online date5 Jun 2019
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 14 May 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print (current) - 5 Jun 2019

Abstract

Our study aimed to determine if certain early life events were more prevalent in cats presenting to veterinary practices specifically for gastrointestinal signs on at least 2 occasions between 6 and 30 months of age. Data from an owner-completed questionnaire for 1,212 cats before 16 weeks of age and subsequent questionnaires for the same cats between 6 and 30 months of age were reviewed. Of the 1,212 cats included, 30 visited a veterinary practice for gastrointestinal signs on two or more occasions. Of the early life events recorded, cats reported with vomiting, diarrhoea or both and/or those not exclusively fed commercial diet(s) that meet the WSAVA Global Nutrition Committee (GNC) guidelines before 16 weeks of age were more likely to visit veterinary practices specifically for gastrointestinal signs on at least two occasions between 6 and 30 months of age (p<0.001, odd’s ratio (OR)=2.64, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.66-4.22 and p=0.030, OR=1.51, 95% CI=1.04-2.22, respectively). Ensuring cats exclusively consume commercial diet(s) that meet the WSAVA GNC guidelines, and further studies identifying specific aetiologies for vomiting and diarrhoea before 16 weeks of age to enable prevention may reduce the number of cats subsequently presenting to primary care veterinary practices for repeated gastrointestinal signs.

    Research areas

  • Feline, Vomiting, diarrhoea, Gastrointestinal, Environment

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  • Full-text PDF (accepted author manuscript)

    Rights statement: This is the author accepted manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via BMJ Publishing at https://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/early/2019/06/04/vr.105040 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Accepted author manuscript, 230 KB, PDF-document

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