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Featured Graphic. Balancing Visibility and Distortion: Remapping the results of the 2015 UK General Election

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Featured Graphic. Balancing Visibility and Distortion : Remapping the results of the 2015 UK General Election. / Harris, Richard; Charlton, Martin; Chris, Brunsdon; Manley, David.

In: Environment and Planning A, 01.09.2017.

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@article{64f3586a0f364a03b1f95faf42a1a026,
title = "Featured Graphic. Balancing Visibility and Distortion: Remapping the results of the 2015 UK General Election",
abstract = "Cartograms are a popular way of presenting place based data that resolve the issue of small areas of high population density being rendered ‘invisible’ on a conventional map. However, as a solution they also flip the problem, distorting both the locations and shapes of other areas. The idea we propose is to strike a balance between visibility and distortion by considering the smallest interpretable unit for the map but otherwise preserving the link between the areas’ physical size and their space on the map. The method is demonstrated with a remapping of the 2015 UK General Election results.",
author = "Richard Harris and Martin Charlton and Brunsdon Chris and David Manley",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0308518X17708439",
language = "English",
journal = "Environment and Planning A",
issn = "0308-518X",
publisher = "Pion",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Featured Graphic. Balancing Visibility and Distortion

T2 - Environment and Planning A

AU - Harris, Richard

AU - Charlton, Martin

AU - Chris, Brunsdon

AU - Manley, David

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Cartograms are a popular way of presenting place based data that resolve the issue of small areas of high population density being rendered ‘invisible’ on a conventional map. However, as a solution they also flip the problem, distorting both the locations and shapes of other areas. The idea we propose is to strike a balance between visibility and distortion by considering the smallest interpretable unit for the map but otherwise preserving the link between the areas’ physical size and their space on the map. The method is demonstrated with a remapping of the 2015 UK General Election results.

AB - Cartograms are a popular way of presenting place based data that resolve the issue of small areas of high population density being rendered ‘invisible’ on a conventional map. However, as a solution they also flip the problem, distorting both the locations and shapes of other areas. The idea we propose is to strike a balance between visibility and distortion by considering the smallest interpretable unit for the map but otherwise preserving the link between the areas’ physical size and their space on the map. The method is demonstrated with a remapping of the 2015 UK General Election results.

U2 - 10.1177/0308518X17708439

DO - 10.1177/0308518X17708439

M3 - Article

JO - Environment and Planning A

JF - Environment and Planning A

SN - 0308-518X

ER -