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Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection

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Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection. / Ison, Catherine A.; Fifer, Helen; Gwynn, Simon; Horner, Paddy; Muir, Peter; Nicholls, Jane; Radcliffe, Keith; Ross, Jonathan; Taylor-Robinson, David; White, John.

In: International Journal of STD and AIDS, Vol. 29, No. 7, 01.06.2018, p. 680-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ison, CA, Fifer, H, Gwynn, S, Horner, P, Muir, P, Nicholls, J, Radcliffe, K, Ross, J, Taylor-Robinson, D & White, J 2018, 'Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection', International Journal of STD and AIDS, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 680-686. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462417753527

APA

Ison, C. A., Fifer, H., Gwynn, S., Horner, P., Muir, P., Nicholls, J., ... White, J. (2018). Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection. International Journal of STD and AIDS, 29(7), 680-686. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462417753527

Vancouver

Ison CA, Fifer H, Gwynn S, Horner P, Muir P, Nicholls J et al. Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection. International Journal of STD and AIDS. 2018 Jun 1;29(7):680-686. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462417753527

Author

Ison, Catherine A. ; Fifer, Helen ; Gwynn, Simon ; Horner, Paddy ; Muir, Peter ; Nicholls, Jane ; Radcliffe, Keith ; Ross, Jonathan ; Taylor-Robinson, David ; White, John. / Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection. In: International Journal of STD and AIDS. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 680-686.

Bibtex

@article{6bd376beac2b4c1dbc4e55263a2edaef,
title = "Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection",
abstract = "Despite Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) being increasingly recognised as a genital pathogen in men and women, awareness and utility of commercially available MG-testing has been low. The opinion of UK sexual health clinicians and allied professionals was sought on how MG-testing should be used. Thirty-two consensus statements were developed by an expert group and circulated to clinicians and laboratory staff, who were asked to evaluate their level of agreement with each statement; 75{\%} agreement was set as the threshold for defining consensus for each statement. A modified Delphi approach was used and high levels of agreement obviated the need to test the original statement set further. Of 201 individuals who received questionnaires, 60 responded, most (48) being sexual health consultants, more than 10{\%} of the total in the UK. Twenty-seven (84.4{\%}) of the statements exceeded the 75{\%} threshold. Respondents strongly supported MG-testing of patients with urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease or unexplained persistent vaginal discharge, or post-coital bleeding. Fewer favoured testing patients with proctitis and support was divided for routinely testing Chlamydia-positive patients. Testing of current sexual contacts of MG-positive patients was supported, as was a test of cure for MG-positive patients, although agreement fell below the 75{\%} threshold. Respondents agreed that all consultant- or specialist-led services should have access to testing for MG (98.3{\%}). There was strong agreement for having MG-testing available for specific patient groups, which may reflect concern over antibiotic resistance and the desire to comply with clinical guidelines that recommend MG-testing in sexual health clinic settings.",
keywords = "Chlamydia, genito-urinary medicine, Mycoplasma genitalium, testing, urethritis",
author = "Ison, {Catherine A.} and Helen Fifer and Simon Gwynn and Paddy Horner and Peter Muir and Jane Nicholls and Keith Radcliffe and Jonathan Ross and David Taylor-Robinson and John White",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0956462417753527",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "680--686",
journal = "International Journal of STD and AIDS",
issn = "0956-4624",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "7",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection

AU - Ison, Catherine A.

AU - Fifer, Helen

AU - Gwynn, Simon

AU - Horner, Paddy

AU - Muir, Peter

AU - Nicholls, Jane

AU - Radcliffe, Keith

AU - Ross, Jonathan

AU - Taylor-Robinson, David

AU - White, John

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Despite Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) being increasingly recognised as a genital pathogen in men and women, awareness and utility of commercially available MG-testing has been low. The opinion of UK sexual health clinicians and allied professionals was sought on how MG-testing should be used. Thirty-two consensus statements were developed by an expert group and circulated to clinicians and laboratory staff, who were asked to evaluate their level of agreement with each statement; 75% agreement was set as the threshold for defining consensus for each statement. A modified Delphi approach was used and high levels of agreement obviated the need to test the original statement set further. Of 201 individuals who received questionnaires, 60 responded, most (48) being sexual health consultants, more than 10% of the total in the UK. Twenty-seven (84.4%) of the statements exceeded the 75% threshold. Respondents strongly supported MG-testing of patients with urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease or unexplained persistent vaginal discharge, or post-coital bleeding. Fewer favoured testing patients with proctitis and support was divided for routinely testing Chlamydia-positive patients. Testing of current sexual contacts of MG-positive patients was supported, as was a test of cure for MG-positive patients, although agreement fell below the 75% threshold. Respondents agreed that all consultant- or specialist-led services should have access to testing for MG (98.3%). There was strong agreement for having MG-testing available for specific patient groups, which may reflect concern over antibiotic resistance and the desire to comply with clinical guidelines that recommend MG-testing in sexual health clinic settings.

AB - Despite Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) being increasingly recognised as a genital pathogen in men and women, awareness and utility of commercially available MG-testing has been low. The opinion of UK sexual health clinicians and allied professionals was sought on how MG-testing should be used. Thirty-two consensus statements were developed by an expert group and circulated to clinicians and laboratory staff, who were asked to evaluate their level of agreement with each statement; 75% agreement was set as the threshold for defining consensus for each statement. A modified Delphi approach was used and high levels of agreement obviated the need to test the original statement set further. Of 201 individuals who received questionnaires, 60 responded, most (48) being sexual health consultants, more than 10% of the total in the UK. Twenty-seven (84.4%) of the statements exceeded the 75% threshold. Respondents strongly supported MG-testing of patients with urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease or unexplained persistent vaginal discharge, or post-coital bleeding. Fewer favoured testing patients with proctitis and support was divided for routinely testing Chlamydia-positive patients. Testing of current sexual contacts of MG-positive patients was supported, as was a test of cure for MG-positive patients, although agreement fell below the 75% threshold. Respondents agreed that all consultant- or specialist-led services should have access to testing for MG (98.3%). There was strong agreement for having MG-testing available for specific patient groups, which may reflect concern over antibiotic resistance and the desire to comply with clinical guidelines that recommend MG-testing in sexual health clinic settings.

KW - Chlamydia

KW - genito-urinary medicine

KW - Mycoplasma genitalium

KW - testing

KW - urethritis

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U2 - 10.1177/0956462417753527

DO - 10.1177/0956462417753527

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 680

EP - 686

JO - International Journal of STD and AIDS

JF - International Journal of STD and AIDS

SN - 0956-4624

IS - 7

ER -