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London: A dividing city, 2001-11?

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London : A dividing city, 2001-11? / Manley, David; Johnston, Ron.

In: City, Vol. 18, No. 6, 28.11.2014, p. 633-643.

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Manley, David ; Johnston, Ron. / London : A dividing city, 2001-11?. In: City. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 633-643.

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@article{3e7e59bdd5c7424793a1dcf9b577f4a8,
title = "London: A dividing city, 2001-11?",
abstract = "There has been a recent debate regarding London's changing class structure and residential mosaic. Using census data for 2001 and 2011, this paper addresses key hypotheses in that debate regarding the expansion of the middle class and a consequent decline of the working class—both numerically and in the areas of the city where they dominate. The analyses falsify those hypotheses: London's working class did not decline over that decade, nor was there any marked shrinkage in the area where it dominated.",
keywords = "class, London, residential concentration",
author = "David Manley and Ron Johnston",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1080/13604813.2014.962880",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "633--643",
journal = "City",
issn = "1360-4813",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis Group",
number = "6",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - London

T2 - A dividing city, 2001-11?

AU - Manley, David

AU - Johnston, Ron

PY - 2014/11/28

Y1 - 2014/11/28

N2 - There has been a recent debate regarding London's changing class structure and residential mosaic. Using census data for 2001 and 2011, this paper addresses key hypotheses in that debate regarding the expansion of the middle class and a consequent decline of the working class—both numerically and in the areas of the city where they dominate. The analyses falsify those hypotheses: London's working class did not decline over that decade, nor was there any marked shrinkage in the area where it dominated.

AB - There has been a recent debate regarding London's changing class structure and residential mosaic. Using census data for 2001 and 2011, this paper addresses key hypotheses in that debate regarding the expansion of the middle class and a consequent decline of the working class—both numerically and in the areas of the city where they dominate. The analyses falsify those hypotheses: London's working class did not decline over that decade, nor was there any marked shrinkage in the area where it dominated.

KW - class

KW - London

KW - residential concentration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84913526692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13604813.2014.962880

DO - 10.1080/13604813.2014.962880

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 633

EP - 643

JO - City

JF - City

SN - 1360-4813

IS - 6

ER -