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Mothers' knowledge and attitudes to sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction messages: results from a UK survey

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Mothers' knowledge and attitudes to sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction messages : results from a UK survey. / Pease, Anna; Blair, Pete; Ingram, Jenny; Fleming, Peter.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol. 103, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 33-38.

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@article{dd06a37d66e54a15a9c265657a6511a9,
title = "Mothers' knowledge and attitudes to sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction messages: results from a UK survey",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate mothers' knowledge of reducing the risks for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and attitudes towards safer sleep practices.DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in deprived areas of Bristol, UK. Recruitment took place in 2014 at local health visitor-led baby clinics.PARTICIPANTS: Of 432 mothers approached, 400 (93{\%}) completed the face-to-face survey. Participants with infants at 'higher' risk of SIDS (using an algorithm based on a previous observational study) were compared with those at 'lower' risk.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The survey asked participants to recall three SIDS risk reduction strategies (unprompted), and scored responses to 14 SIDS risk-related infant sleep scenarios (prompted).RESULTS: Overall, 48/400 (12{\%}) mothers were classified as higher risk. Mothers in the higher risk group were less likely to breast feed (multivariate OR=3.59(95{\%} CI 1.46 to 8.86)), less likely to be able to cite two or more unprompted correct SIDS risk reduction strategies (multivariate OR=2.05(95{\%} CI 1.02 to 4.13)) and scored lower on prompted safer sleep scenarios overall.Notably, only 206/400 (52{\%}) of all mothers surveyed (33{\%} in the higher risk group) from these deprived areas in Bristol identified infant sleep position as a risk reduction strategy for SIDS, despite 25 years of campaigns.CONCLUSIONS: Mothers in the higher risk group were disadvantaged when it came to some aspects of knowledge of SIDS risk reduction and attitudes to safer sleep. The initial 'Back-to Sleep' message that dramatically reduced these deaths a generation ago needs more effective promotion for today's generation of mothers.",
keywords = "epidemiology, infant, public health, SIDS, sleep",
author = "Anna Pease and Pete Blair and Jenny Ingram and Peter Fleming",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1136/archdischild-2017-312927",
language = "English",
volume = "103",
pages = "33--38",
journal = "Archives of Disease in Childhood",
issn = "0003-9888",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mothers' knowledge and attitudes to sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction messages

T2 - results from a UK survey

AU - Pease, Anna

AU - Blair, Pete

AU - Ingram, Jenny

AU - Fleming, Peter

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate mothers' knowledge of reducing the risks for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and attitudes towards safer sleep practices.DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in deprived areas of Bristol, UK. Recruitment took place in 2014 at local health visitor-led baby clinics.PARTICIPANTS: Of 432 mothers approached, 400 (93%) completed the face-to-face survey. Participants with infants at 'higher' risk of SIDS (using an algorithm based on a previous observational study) were compared with those at 'lower' risk.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The survey asked participants to recall three SIDS risk reduction strategies (unprompted), and scored responses to 14 SIDS risk-related infant sleep scenarios (prompted).RESULTS: Overall, 48/400 (12%) mothers were classified as higher risk. Mothers in the higher risk group were less likely to breast feed (multivariate OR=3.59(95% CI 1.46 to 8.86)), less likely to be able to cite two or more unprompted correct SIDS risk reduction strategies (multivariate OR=2.05(95% CI 1.02 to 4.13)) and scored lower on prompted safer sleep scenarios overall.Notably, only 206/400 (52%) of all mothers surveyed (33% in the higher risk group) from these deprived areas in Bristol identified infant sleep position as a risk reduction strategy for SIDS, despite 25 years of campaigns.CONCLUSIONS: Mothers in the higher risk group were disadvantaged when it came to some aspects of knowledge of SIDS risk reduction and attitudes to safer sleep. The initial 'Back-to Sleep' message that dramatically reduced these deaths a generation ago needs more effective promotion for today's generation of mothers.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate mothers' knowledge of reducing the risks for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and attitudes towards safer sleep practices.DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in deprived areas of Bristol, UK. Recruitment took place in 2014 at local health visitor-led baby clinics.PARTICIPANTS: Of 432 mothers approached, 400 (93%) completed the face-to-face survey. Participants with infants at 'higher' risk of SIDS (using an algorithm based on a previous observational study) were compared with those at 'lower' risk.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The survey asked participants to recall three SIDS risk reduction strategies (unprompted), and scored responses to 14 SIDS risk-related infant sleep scenarios (prompted).RESULTS: Overall, 48/400 (12%) mothers were classified as higher risk. Mothers in the higher risk group were less likely to breast feed (multivariate OR=3.59(95% CI 1.46 to 8.86)), less likely to be able to cite two or more unprompted correct SIDS risk reduction strategies (multivariate OR=2.05(95% CI 1.02 to 4.13)) and scored lower on prompted safer sleep scenarios overall.Notably, only 206/400 (52%) of all mothers surveyed (33% in the higher risk group) from these deprived areas in Bristol identified infant sleep position as a risk reduction strategy for SIDS, despite 25 years of campaigns.CONCLUSIONS: Mothers in the higher risk group were disadvantaged when it came to some aspects of knowledge of SIDS risk reduction and attitudes to safer sleep. The initial 'Back-to Sleep' message that dramatically reduced these deaths a generation ago needs more effective promotion for today's generation of mothers.

KW - epidemiology

KW - infant

KW - public health

KW - SIDS

KW - sleep

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039046611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/archdischild-2017-312927

DO - 10.1136/archdischild-2017-312927

M3 - Article

VL - 103

SP - 33

EP - 38

JO - Archives of Disease in Childhood

JF - Archives of Disease in Childhood

SN - 0003-9888

IS - 1

ER -