Skip to content

Rich Genomic-Scale Data Sets with an Expanded Remipede Sampling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2055–2070
Number of pages24
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume11
Issue number8
Early online date4 Jul 2019
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 5 Jun 2019
DateE-pub ahead of print - 4 Jul 2019
DatePublished (current) - Aug 2019

Abstract

The relationships of crustaceans and hexapods (Pancrustacea) have been much discussed and partially elucidated following the emergence of phylogenomic data sets. However, major uncertainties still remain regarding the position of iconic taxa such as Branchiopoda, Copepoda, Remipedia, and Cephalocarida, and the sister group relationship of hexapods. We assembled the most taxon-rich phylogenomic pancrustacean data set to date and analyzed it using a variety of methodological approaches. We prioritised low levels of missing data and found that some clades were consistently recovered independently of the analytical approach used. These include, for example, Oligostraca and Altocrustacea. Substantial support was also found for Allotriocarida, with Remipedia as the sister of Hexapoda (i.e., Labiocarida), and Branchiopoda as the sister of Labiocarida, a clade that we name Athalassocarida (="non-marine shrimps"). Within Allotriocarida, Cephalocarida was found as the sister of Athalassocarida. Finally, moderate support was found for Hexanauplia (Copepoda as sister to Thecostraca) in alliance with Malacostraca. Mapping key crustacean tagmosis patterns and developmental characters across the revised phylogeny suggests that the ancestral pancrustacean was relatively short-bodied, with extreme body elongation and anamorphic development emerging later in pancrustacean evolution.

    Research areas

  • Pancrustacea, crustacean phylogeny, transcriptomics, Dayhoff recoding, remipedes

Documents

Documents

  • Full-text PDF (final published version)

    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Oxford University Press at https://academic.oup.com/gbe/article/11/8/2055/5528088 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Final published version, 1 MB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

DOI

View research connections

Related faculties, schools or groups