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Prevalence and correlates of domestic violence among people seeking treatment for self-harm: data from a regional self-harm register

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Prevalence and correlates of domestic violence among people seeking treatment for self-harm : data from a regional self-harm register. / Dalton, Tom; Knipe, Dee; Feder, Gene S; Williams, Salena; Gunnell, David; Moran, Paul.

In: Emergency Medicine Journal, 25.06.2019.

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@article{249e22c697774005a2ae93bd2fd3b93d,
title = "Prevalence and correlates of domestic violence among people seeking treatment for self-harm: data from a regional self-harm register",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that there is an association between domestic violence (DV) and self-harm (SH). Yet, the prevalence and clinical significance of DV among individuals presenting acutely to hospital with self-harm in the UK is unknown.METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using registry data in order to describe the prevalence of DV within a UK population of individuals presenting to the emergency department (ED) with SH (n=1142).RESULTS: 11.1{\%} (95{\%} CI 9.4{\%} – 13.1{\%}) of the sample reported DV. Those reporting DV were more likely to be female and separated from a partner. DV was associated with self-poisoning and with previous occurrence of SH.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that DV victimisation is more prevalent among those presenting to ED with self-harm compared the general population of ED attenders, and that the presence of DV may signify increased risk among those presenting to ED with SH.",
author = "Tom Dalton and Dee Knipe and Feder, {Gene S} and Salena Williams and David Gunnell and Paul Moran",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1136/emermed-2018-207561",
language = "English",
journal = "Emergency Medicine Journal",
issn = "1472-0205",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and correlates of domestic violence among people seeking treatment for self-harm

T2 - data from a regional self-harm register

AU - Dalton, Tom

AU - Knipe, Dee

AU - Feder, Gene S

AU - Williams, Salena

AU - Gunnell, David

AU - Moran, Paul

PY - 2019/6/25

Y1 - 2019/6/25

N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that there is an association between domestic violence (DV) and self-harm (SH). Yet, the prevalence and clinical significance of DV among individuals presenting acutely to hospital with self-harm in the UK is unknown.METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using registry data in order to describe the prevalence of DV within a UK population of individuals presenting to the emergency department (ED) with SH (n=1142).RESULTS: 11.1% (95% CI 9.4% – 13.1%) of the sample reported DV. Those reporting DV were more likely to be female and separated from a partner. DV was associated with self-poisoning and with previous occurrence of SH.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that DV victimisation is more prevalent among those presenting to ED with self-harm compared the general population of ED attenders, and that the presence of DV may signify increased risk among those presenting to ED with SH.

AB - BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that there is an association between domestic violence (DV) and self-harm (SH). Yet, the prevalence and clinical significance of DV among individuals presenting acutely to hospital with self-harm in the UK is unknown.METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using registry data in order to describe the prevalence of DV within a UK population of individuals presenting to the emergency department (ED) with SH (n=1142).RESULTS: 11.1% (95% CI 9.4% – 13.1%) of the sample reported DV. Those reporting DV were more likely to be female and separated from a partner. DV was associated with self-poisoning and with previous occurrence of SH.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that DV victimisation is more prevalent among those presenting to ED with self-harm compared the general population of ED attenders, and that the presence of DV may signify increased risk among those presenting to ED with SH.

U2 - 10.1136/emermed-2018-207561

DO - 10.1136/emermed-2018-207561

M3 - Article

JO - Emergency Medicine Journal

JF - Emergency Medicine Journal

SN - 1472-0205

ER -