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The criminalisation of paying for sex in England and Wales: How gender and power are implicated in the making of policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-189
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Public Policy
Volume38
Issue number2
Early online date6 Feb 2017
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 22 Nov 2016
DateE-pub ahead of print - 6 Feb 2017
DatePublished (current) - 1 Jun 2018

Abstract

This article considers how gender and power are implicated in how prostitution policy is translated from initial proposal to enactment in law. The analysis brings together Freeman's proposal for "policy translation" (2009) and Connell's work on "hegemonic masculinity" (1987 with Messerschmidt 2005) to examine Hansard and other United Kingdom Parliament documents relating to Clause 13/14 of the Policing and Crime Bill 2008-2009, a proposal to criminalise the purchase of sex in England and Wales. It is argued here that hegemonic masculinity is implicated in how "responsibility" and "exploitation" in relation to sex purchase are disputed and defined within the Parliamentary debates on Clause 13/14, and this in turn informed the version of criminalisation that emerged as authoritative. This article reflects finally on how far mapping the translation of policy can elucidate the operation of gender and power within the policy process.

    Research areas

  • Gender, Parliament, Policy, Power, Prostitution, Translation

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via Cambridge University Press at https://doi.org/10.1017/S0143814X16000295. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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    Licence: CC BY

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