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The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: A step towards hydrological predictions under change?

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The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation : A step towards hydrological predictions under change? / Nijzink, Remko; Hutton, Christopher; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Capell, René; Arheimer, Berit; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Wagener, Thorsten; McGuire, Kevin; Savenije, Hubert; Hrachowitz, Markus.

In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 20, No. 12, 05.12.2016, p. 4775-4799.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Nijzink, R, Hutton, C, Pechlivanidis, I, Capell, R, Arheimer, B, Freer, J, Han, D, Wagener, T, McGuire, K, Savenije, H & Hrachowitz, M 2016, 'The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: A step towards hydrological predictions under change?', Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, vol. 20, no. 12, pp. 4775-4799. https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016

APA

Nijzink, R., Hutton, C., Pechlivanidis, I., Capell, R., Arheimer, B., Freer, J., ... Hrachowitz, M. (2016). The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: A step towards hydrological predictions under change? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 20(12), 4775-4799. https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016

Vancouver

Nijzink R, Hutton C, Pechlivanidis I, Capell R, Arheimer B, Freer J et al. The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: A step towards hydrological predictions under change? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences. 2016 Dec 5;20(12):4775-4799. https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016

Author

Nijzink, Remko ; Hutton, Christopher ; Pechlivanidis, Ilias ; Capell, René ; Arheimer, Berit ; Freer, Jim ; Han, Dawei ; Wagener, Thorsten ; McGuire, Kevin ; Savenije, Hubert ; Hrachowitz, Markus. / The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation : A step towards hydrological predictions under change?. In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 20, No. 12. pp. 4775-4799.

Bibtex

@article{752379e26ae94b7ab3a8c4b63449bb6f,
title = "The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation: A step towards hydrological predictions under change?",
abstract = "The core component of many hydrological systems, the moisture storage capacity available to vegetation, is impossible to observe directly at the catchment scale and is typically treated as a calibration parameter or obtained from a priori available soil characteristics combined with estimates of rooting depth. Often this parameter is considered to remain constant in time. Using long-term data (30-40 years) from three experimental catchments that underwent significant land cover change, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) the root-zone storage capacity significantly changes after deforestation, (2) changes in the root-zone storage capacity can to a large extent explain post-treatment changes to the hydrological regimes and that (3) a time-dynamic formulation of the root-zone storage can improve the performance of a hydrological model.A recently introduced method to estimate catchment-scale root-zone storage capacities based on climate data (i.e. observed rainfall and an estimate of transpiration) was used to reproduce the temporal evolution of root-zone storage capacity under change. Briefly, the maximum deficit that arises from the difference between cumulative daily precipitation and transpiration can be considered as a proxy for root-zone storage capacity. This value was compared to the value obtained from four different conceptual hydrological models that were calibrated for consecutive 2-year windows. It was found that water-balance-derived root-zone storage capacities were similar to the values obtained from calibration of the hydrological models. A sharp decline in root-zone storage capacity was observed after deforestation, followed by a gradual recovery, for two of the three catchments. Trend analysis suggested hydrological recovery periods between 5 and 13 years after deforestation. In a proof-of-concept analysis, one of the hydrological models was adapted to allow dynamically changing root-zone storage capacities, following the observed changes due to deforestation. Although the overall performance of the modified model did not considerably change, in 51{\%} of all the evaluated hydrological signatures, considering all three catchments, improvements were observed when adding a time-variant representation of the root-zone storage to the model. In summary, it is shown that root-zone moisture storage capacities can be highly affected by deforestation and climatic influences and that a simple method exclusively based on climate data can not only provide robust, catchment-scale estimates of this critical parameter, but also reflect its time-dynamic behaviour after deforestation.",
author = "Remko Nijzink and Christopher Hutton and Ilias Pechlivanidis and Ren{\'e} Capell and Berit Arheimer and Jim Freer and Dawei Han and Thorsten Wagener and Kevin McGuire and Hubert Savenije and Markus Hrachowitz",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "5",
doi = "10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "4775--4799",
journal = "Hydrology and Earth System Sciences",
issn = "1027-5606",
publisher = "Copernicus GmbH",
number = "12",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - The evolution of root-zone moisture capacities after deforestation

T2 - A step towards hydrological predictions under change?

AU - Nijzink, Remko

AU - Hutton, Christopher

AU - Pechlivanidis, Ilias

AU - Capell, René

AU - Arheimer, Berit

AU - Freer, Jim

AU - Han, Dawei

AU - Wagener, Thorsten

AU - McGuire, Kevin

AU - Savenije, Hubert

AU - Hrachowitz, Markus

PY - 2016/12/5

Y1 - 2016/12/5

N2 - The core component of many hydrological systems, the moisture storage capacity available to vegetation, is impossible to observe directly at the catchment scale and is typically treated as a calibration parameter or obtained from a priori available soil characteristics combined with estimates of rooting depth. Often this parameter is considered to remain constant in time. Using long-term data (30-40 years) from three experimental catchments that underwent significant land cover change, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) the root-zone storage capacity significantly changes after deforestation, (2) changes in the root-zone storage capacity can to a large extent explain post-treatment changes to the hydrological regimes and that (3) a time-dynamic formulation of the root-zone storage can improve the performance of a hydrological model.A recently introduced method to estimate catchment-scale root-zone storage capacities based on climate data (i.e. observed rainfall and an estimate of transpiration) was used to reproduce the temporal evolution of root-zone storage capacity under change. Briefly, the maximum deficit that arises from the difference between cumulative daily precipitation and transpiration can be considered as a proxy for root-zone storage capacity. This value was compared to the value obtained from four different conceptual hydrological models that were calibrated for consecutive 2-year windows. It was found that water-balance-derived root-zone storage capacities were similar to the values obtained from calibration of the hydrological models. A sharp decline in root-zone storage capacity was observed after deforestation, followed by a gradual recovery, for two of the three catchments. Trend analysis suggested hydrological recovery periods between 5 and 13 years after deforestation. In a proof-of-concept analysis, one of the hydrological models was adapted to allow dynamically changing root-zone storage capacities, following the observed changes due to deforestation. Although the overall performance of the modified model did not considerably change, in 51% of all the evaluated hydrological signatures, considering all three catchments, improvements were observed when adding a time-variant representation of the root-zone storage to the model. In summary, it is shown that root-zone moisture storage capacities can be highly affected by deforestation and climatic influences and that a simple method exclusively based on climate data can not only provide robust, catchment-scale estimates of this critical parameter, but also reflect its time-dynamic behaviour after deforestation.

AB - The core component of many hydrological systems, the moisture storage capacity available to vegetation, is impossible to observe directly at the catchment scale and is typically treated as a calibration parameter or obtained from a priori available soil characteristics combined with estimates of rooting depth. Often this parameter is considered to remain constant in time. Using long-term data (30-40 years) from three experimental catchments that underwent significant land cover change, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) the root-zone storage capacity significantly changes after deforestation, (2) changes in the root-zone storage capacity can to a large extent explain post-treatment changes to the hydrological regimes and that (3) a time-dynamic formulation of the root-zone storage can improve the performance of a hydrological model.A recently introduced method to estimate catchment-scale root-zone storage capacities based on climate data (i.e. observed rainfall and an estimate of transpiration) was used to reproduce the temporal evolution of root-zone storage capacity under change. Briefly, the maximum deficit that arises from the difference between cumulative daily precipitation and transpiration can be considered as a proxy for root-zone storage capacity. This value was compared to the value obtained from four different conceptual hydrological models that were calibrated for consecutive 2-year windows. It was found that water-balance-derived root-zone storage capacities were similar to the values obtained from calibration of the hydrological models. A sharp decline in root-zone storage capacity was observed after deforestation, followed by a gradual recovery, for two of the three catchments. Trend analysis suggested hydrological recovery periods between 5 and 13 years after deforestation. In a proof-of-concept analysis, one of the hydrological models was adapted to allow dynamically changing root-zone storage capacities, following the observed changes due to deforestation. Although the overall performance of the modified model did not considerably change, in 51% of all the evaluated hydrological signatures, considering all three catchments, improvements were observed when adding a time-variant representation of the root-zone storage to the model. In summary, it is shown that root-zone moisture storage capacities can be highly affected by deforestation and climatic influences and that a simple method exclusively based on climate data can not only provide robust, catchment-scale estimates of this critical parameter, but also reflect its time-dynamic behaviour after deforestation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85002050790&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016

DO - 10.5194/hess-20-4775-2016

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 4775

EP - 4799

JO - Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

JF - Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

SN - 1027-5606

IS - 12

ER -