Skip to content

What is consumption, where has it been going, and does it still matter?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-517
Number of pages19
JournalThe Sociological Review
Volume67
Issue number3
Early online date7 Mar 2018
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 3 Mar 2018
DateE-pub ahead of print - 7 Mar 2018
DatePublished (current) - 1 May 2019

Abstract

This article considers the relationships between consumption, the environment, and wider sociological endeavour. The current vogue for applying theories of practice to the policy domain of ‘sustainable consumption’ has been generative of conceptual renewal, however the field now sits closer to the applied environmental social sciences than to the sociology of consumption. The analysis proceeds via a close reading of the intellectual currents that have given rise to this situation, and it identifies a number of interrelated issues concerning conceptual slippage and the exclusion of core disciplinary concerns. Accordingly a more suitable definition of consumption is offered, an agenda for re-engaging with foundational approaches to consumer culture is established, and a renewal and reorientation of critique is proposed. Working through and building on the contributions of practice theoretical repertoires, this article suggests that consumption scholarship offers a distinctive set of resources to discussions of current ecological crises and uncertain social futures. These are briefly described and the conclusion argues that consumption still matters.

Download statistics

No data available

Documents

Documents

  • Full-text PDF (accepted author manuscript)

    Rights statement: This is the accepted author manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via Sage at https://doi.org/10.1177%2F0038026118764028 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Accepted author manuscript, 304 KB, PDF document

    Licence: Other

DOI

View research connections

Related faculties, schools or groups